Considerations for Adoptive Parents…a personal and professional perspective

11 Aug

Sixteen years ago,  i was sitting in the library researching areas that i thought might be best to place ads geared towards biological parents who wanted to place their newborn in the hands of adoptive parents.  My now fifteen year old son’s father and i were anxious to find a newborn and worked with our attorney – placing advertisements in Texas publications.  As advised by our adoption parent committee mentors here in new york city we acquired an 800 number and ultimately received calls from a number of women, including a hopeful surrogate.  This was a path that we chose not to pursue.  We, created business cards and told many people that we were in this process.  My most important concern at the time was locating a healthy newborn.

Something now in retrospect strikes me as interesting,,,,,i have no recollection of having picked up a book such as “what to expect when you’re expecting”. The only book that i recall reading was one given to me by one of my brothers.  It pertained to care of a newborn.  Alone in San Antonio for ten days, my son’s father and I found this extremely useful.  Perhaps I am forgetting something; but, I do not recall any workshops at monthly meetings or annual adoption conferences in which this was discussed. 

At this point, i work with newborns and children in early childhood year as a speech-language pathologist, mostly in their homes.  Some of them have adopted children. In preparing this post, I reached out to my colleagues about what literature they may have come across related to this topic.  I started to realize that there are some professionals in my industry that actually specialize in working with these children  A new revelation.

I am working on gathering more material about adoption for upcoming posts.  There is a lot of information for just one post.  For the moment, I suggest that prospective adoptive parents remember to read books that discuss typical developmental skills that you would see in children. 

Resources:

“Parenting” sections in bookstores such as Barnes and Nobles

“Parenting and Families” section  of the Kindle Bookstore – if you have this e-reader and i assume that the other e-readers have a similar section in their respective “bookstore”

Bookstores of the American Occupational Therapy Association, American Physical Therapy Association and American Speech-Language Hearing Association respectively, have books on their sites that you can consider

Parenting organizations in your area-check your phone books as they are also a great wealth  of information.

It Takes Two to Talk: A Parent’s Guide to Helping Children Communicate by Ayala Manolson

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