Tag Archives: Autism

Early Intervention Providers: Important Training to Develop Evaluation Skills

9 Oct

 
 
A colleague of mine provides this training and it has served as an invaluable resource  in completion of evaluations to increase likelihoood of children receiving our services.  In a highly difficult economic climate it is imperative for those of us who act as the voices for children who cannot speak to enroll in these highly helpful courses.   Rebecca Alva is on linkedin and you can connect with her there as well. 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Next EI Training Oct. 15th In NYC!

October 4th, 2011 | Author: Rebecca Alva
Performing Evaluations In Early Intervention is Coming Back to NYC!Location: Pearl Studios NYC, 519 Eighth Avenue (btw 35th & 36th), 12th Fl. (212) 904-1850

**********Early Bird Price of $227. applies for the September and October Dates!!**********

Look at The Trainings and Testimonial Tabs For Full Details

 

 
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EI Training In Commack, NY (LI) Held Today!

October 2nd, 2011 | Author: Rebecca Alva
Held my first EI Training in Commack, NY (LI) today. Here is what two attendees had to say:The course was very helpful in learning how to properly perform and write a complete Early Intervention Evaluation.
Erika Witt, Speech-Language Pathologist

Very informative, useful information.
Madelyn Ratkus, Speech-Language Pathologist

 

 
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“Thank You A Million Times Over”

September 30th, 2011 | Author: Rebecca Alva
An SLP Provider who has taken my trainings sent me the following e-mail with the subject line above, “I am writing up an eval on a bilingual baby that I saw with a translator….. I have your binder at my side…it is an invaluable resource right now.l’shanah tovah wherever you are today!

Robin Sue Kahn M.S., CCC/SLP
Speech-Language Pathologist

 

 
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October 1st EI Training Rescheduled!

September 30th, 2011 | Author: Rebecca Alva
The training has been rescheduled for Saturday – September 15th in NYC.Location: Pearl Studios NYC (212) 904.1850

519 Eighth Avenue, NY

Studio L

Thanks!

 

 
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Just finished giving a training yesterday on Performing Evaluations In Early Intervention!

September 25th, 2011 | Author: Rebecca Alva
Here is what two providers had to say about yesterday’s training:Rebecca Alva tailored this course to the immediate needs of Early Intervention Evaluators. This information is going to be so helpful when writing and performing evaluators. Many of the resources provided will help raise the quality of EI evaluations that are performed.
Karen M. Mackin, Speech-Language Pathologist

This course will really be helpful to me as I write my evals. Now I know exactly what the Evaluation Standards Unit wants as far as Informed Clinical Opinion…
Jennifer Sitler Redpath, Speech-Language Pathologist

 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Fall EI Trainings!

September 10th, 2011 | Author: Rebecca Alva
Performing Evaluations In Early InterventionCOURSE DESCRIPTION
Infants and toddlers from birth through age two, who live in New York City and who have a diagnosed physical or mental condition that has a high probability of resulting in a developmental delay, or who are suspected of having a developmental delay or disability are entitled to a developmental screening or a comprehensive evaluation to determine eligibility for additional early intervention services. Delays may be in one or more of the following areas of development: cognitive, physical, communication, social/emotional, and/or adaptive. Children at risk of a disability are eligible for initial screening, and will receive periodic screenings through the New York City Infant Child Health Assessment Program.

Providers are faced with increasing amounts of confusion and frustration in performing evaluations in the Early Intervention Program. EI providers will understand and learn how to properly incorporate several sources of information and improve the quality of their evaluations reports.

LEARNING OUTCOMES
• Discuss NYS DOH Public Health Law, codes, rules and regulations as it applies to Early Intervention.
• Discuss the Adopted Early Intervention Program Regulations 6/3/2010.
• Discuss NYS Memorandum 2005-02 Standards and Procedures for Evaluations, Reimbursement, Eligibility requirements and Determinations under the Early Intervention Program.
• Describe how no single procedure or instrument may be used as the sole indicator of eligibility in EI.
• Discuss how to appropriately interpret and use test scores in MDE (Multidisciplinary Evaluations).
• Describe how to incorporate information from a variety of appropriate sources into MDE’s.
• Describe how to appropriately use Clinical Clues and Predictors from the Clinical Practice Guideline: Communication Disorders, Autism/PDD, Hearing Impairments and Motor Disorders (Oral Motor Assessment for Feeding and Swallowing) in MDE’s.
• Formulate an Informed Clinical Opinion in MDE’s.

AGENDA
9:00 Registration & Refreshments
9:30 Introduction, Public Health Law & Adopted Early Intervention Program Regulations 6/3/2010
10:00 Regulations & Guidelines – Memo 2005-02
11:30 Break
11:45 Test Instruments, Use & Interpretation
1:00 Lunch on your own
2:00 Clinical Practice Guidelines, Clinical Clues/Predictors
3:30 Break
3:45 Integrating Several Sources of Information & Formulating your Informed Clinical Opinion
4:30 Group Discussion, Questions, Comment Form
5:00 Course Concludes

TARGET AUDIENCE
Speech-Language Pathologists*
Special Education Teachers
Physical Therapists
Occupational Therapists
Audiologist
Licensed Psychologists
Licensed Social Workers
Agency Directors & Personnel

CONTINUING EDUCATION CREDITS
*Participants must have paid registration fee, signed-in, miss no more than 1 hr., participate in a written self examination and signed out in order to receive a Certificate of Completion.

Failure to sign-in or out will result in forfeiture of credit for the entire course. No exceptions will be made. Partial credit is not available.

DATES & LOCATIONS
Sept 24th (Sat-Queens), Oct 1st (Sat-NYC), Oct 2nd (Sun-LI), Nov 5th (Sat-NYC) and Dec 17th (Sat-NYC)

Course Locations:
Queens
92-30 56th Avenue, Rego Park, NY 11373 (Toledo Court Community Room)
(Behind Queens Center Shopping Mall & Next to Newtown Preschool/Playground).

New York City
Pearl Studios NYC, 519 Eighth Avenue (btw 35th & 36th), 12th Fl. (212) 904-1850

Long Island
Wingate by Wyndham Commack, Long Island NY – 801 Crooked Hill Road Brentwood, NY 11717

REGISTRATION & FEES
Improve the quality of your evaluations by registering for this training!
Register by phone: 917.885.3146 or by e-mail: ralva@bigplanet.com

*****Early Bird Price of $227 applies for the September and October Dates!!!*****

Registration Fee: $257
Early Bird: $227 (Must Be Received/Paid for 25 days prior to the training dates for Nov & Dec)
Group Rates: $217 each (2+), $207 each (4+), $197 each (6+) and $187 each (8+)

ALL PAYMENTS MUST BE PAID IN FULL PRIOR TO ATTENDANCE
Mail Check Payments to: Rebecca Alva, 92-30 56th Ave, Apt. 4N, Rego Park, NY 11373 or
by Credit Card (VISA, MasterCard, Amex) via Paypal – http://www.paypal.com

Note: The fee includes materials/handouts and light refreshments.
Please submit your accommodation requests for special needs in writing via e-mail at lease two weeks prior to the course.

CONFIRMATIONS & CANCELLATIONS
Confirmation: is available upon receipt of payment and sent via e-mail in an effort to be “green”.

Cancellation Policy (Organization): Evaluations Standards Training, LLC reserves the right to cancel or reschedule any course/workshop/training due to insufficient registration or extenuating circumstances. A full refund will be provided to the participants unless they choose a credit towards a future training. If the refund is requested, it will be in the same format of payment either by check or credit card.

Cancellation Policy (Participant): A refund less a $50.00 administration fee will be provided upon receipt of written request. Refund requests must be received by mail (postmarked) or e-mail 8 days or more prior to the date of the training. There is no refund for cancellations received 7 days or less prior to the date of training; however, a credit will be issued toward a future training.

 

 
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Back From Hiatus!

September 9th, 2011 | Author: Rebecca Alva
EI Trainings To Continue This Fall!Performing Evaluations will be offered in October, November and December.

Dates and Locations (NYC/LI) to follow!

 

 
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Performing Evaluations In Early Intervention – February 13, 2011

February 25th, 2011 | Author: Rebecca Alva
On February 13, 2011 Providers attended the 2nd EI Training on Performing Evaluations In Early Intervention. Here is what one Provider had to say: This training truly was a training like no other. We were provided with tons of functional information that I intend to use ASAP! I now am more clear on the regulations put forth by Early Intervention Department of Health.
Alisha Price, SLP 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Teaching Students at Teachers College, Columbia University

February 25th, 2011 | Author: Rebecca Alva
I was asked by Catherine J. Crowley, CCC-SLP, J.D., Ph.D., ASHA Fellow and Board Recognized Specialist in Child Language, to teach her Assessment and Evaluation class on Thursday, February 24th at Teachers College, Columbia University. My lecture for the students was on the Standards and Procedures for Evaluations & Eligibility Requirements Under the Early Intervention Program. It was great sharing my knowledge with the students! 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Performing Evaluations In Early Intervention – January 23, 2011

February 25th, 2011 | Author: Rebecca Alva
Here is what two Providers had to say about the EI Training:Amazing! This workshop was very helpful & informative. I received a lot of documents that will help me when writing evaluations. The information received will also help me to evaluate myself in how I approach evaluations. I learned a lot regarding the laws and regulations that determine eligibility for Early Intervention. I am now able to provide support for any recommendations I make in future evaluations. Jeanel Burgess-Belfon, Speech-Language Pathologist

It was very informative and it was nice to get paper copies of all the materials. Rebecca was very knowledgeable and an engaging speaker. I loved learning about the laws that are in place and I think that this will help me to be a better report/eval writer in general. Maria Niemiec, Special Educator

 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
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Copyright © 2011 Rebecca Alva, M.A. CCC-SLP. All Rights Reserved.

 
 
 
 
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ADHD Cases on the Rise According to ABC News….Now What do we do???

19 Aug

ADHD Cases on the Rise – ABC News.

WOW….this is now being realized and you can read this article or search for others as they are being written in a number of publications recently.  That is not the point of this post.  Please read on..now that I have your attention….let’s focus 🙂

Given this recent finding,  I think that it is going to be so important for people to know more from those of us involved in raising children with the problem, those of us who actually work with these individuals in our professional lives, those of us who may actually diagnose the condition and have to discuss the signs and symptoms to the adult or the parents of a child. I am not convinced that people truly understand this disorder.  Knowledge is power and if we empower others with more information about what makes the ADHD brain tick,,,what makes it unique and what struggles and strengths it brings to the lives of those who live with it day to day then it will make it so much easier for them.  I believe that this goes for most medical problems or differences with which a person lives.  The more you understand the easier a time you will have in life.  You will be able  to learn to compensate and perhaps even overcome the obstacles.  

With this in mind….

Please….. Tell – the parent, the adult, the child  who is old enough to understand…what the struggles will be that they may face.  Please – help them to understand the signs and symptoms of ADHD that may affect them in their day to day lives.  What resources are available to assist them.  What some of the conditions are that may potentially coexist with this such as oppositional defiant disorder, conduct disorder, mood disorders, anxiety.  The impact of medication – including  its side effects is extremely important to relate.

I have heard comments like: I do not understand why my skin gets itchy if i put cream on it, why does this fabric bother me? he only eats soft spicy food….nothing else!  it is so hard to find foods that my son/daughter can eat because he is so fussy.  my child cannot fall asleep, “i have insomnia”, another says.  “turn off all the lights …it is too bright in here”, “i can’t eat this (maybe it is the texture of the food), “he won’t let me brush his teeth and washing his hair is a struggle because he pulls away”.  Educate people about the sensory integration and regulation difficulties like these.  Let them know that this is just a part of their make-up.   

Years ago I went with my son to the circus…..never again! He was overcome by the loud noise.  Neither the sensory overload during a vacation such as Disneyworld nor the quiet and peaceful setting where all slowed down on a dude ranch would work as vacation sites.  The predictability of a setting like Club Med – where the transitions from one activity to another could be planned in advance and known – no unexpected changes was a better fit…albeit not perfect.  A trip like a cruise may or may not work….yes it is predctable and there is a structure in place before you go; but, would the pace of getting from stop to stop during the vacation be too slow?  I do not have ADHD but would find this an issue.  Something to think about ….

For parents of children both camp settings and schools need to be considered.  A play ground of five hundred students waiting to start the day standing in line, then heading like a stampede, running up the staircases in a loud and echoing stairwell to the classroom…. by the time upstairs in the class, the ADHD student would be ready for time out to de-stress from the experience of even preparing for the classroom setting. There are specialized camps for children and programs for teens with ADHD.  Teachers at school and counselors in a camp setting need to understand the problems that may occur.  

College students with ADHD will have to advocate for themselves and also be aware that there may be better programs for them then others that may not be geared to the learning differences with which they come to school. Research the programs that are available.  Talk with organizations that cater to the person with ADHD and join a support group so that you can gain resources.

We need to be advocates – for ourselves, our patients, our children.  Please help…..

Autistic Wandering: a new ICD-9 code as of 10/1/11: Think about it from different perspectives!

1 Aug

I look at this code from a few different perspectives.  Let me share with you, if you have the time to take a look at this post. 

As a child; if I am recalling this correctly, my cousin who is six months younger than I had wandered out from his home in New Jersey.  People were looking for him.  Yes, he was finally found; but, this now autistic adult could not relate to you his name.  At least, that was at the point that I last saw him which was some time ago.  I do not think that he had the acuity of expressing general knowledge that included his address or phone number.  I doubt that he could have been able to relate to another person that he was indeed lost.  We are out of touch now, but the disorder is not. 

My colleagues have written questions about what the practical implications of imposing a label such as this on autistic persons will have.  I respond with a question:  How would an autistic person who wanders off, a person who could not even communicate that he was lost, could not give them his or her name to another people feel.  He or she would  most likely be scared.  When a person who is autistic becomes that way he or she generally has difficulty managing their own behavior.  I remember seeing that.  In layman’s terms, you may call it being confused and visualize it in the form of a tantrum. So, what does alerting others to the tendency for a person to wander off do. Think about this from a practical standpoint, the viewpoint of the person who is experiencing this.   I think this is an incredibly helpful move on the part of the mental health community and a way of keeping people who are autistic safe. As well, defining this for people who suffer from dementia has the same meaning to me.  I applaud their efforts. 

As an add-on thought to this “issue of the week”, so to speak, I wonder how others literally on the street would hear about this disorder were they to find someone “wandering”.  Rather than thinking of them as potentially drunk or as having consumed illegal drugs i think it would also be helpful if these people were automatically given a bracelet that identifies them out in public as having this condition. One could consider this as a safety precaution.  Some people wear medic alert jewelry or watches to identify themselves and their medical condition, in the event of an emergency.  It would be helpful for all of us.  It is just a thought and if you are a healthcare provider, a parent or caregiver in my opinion it would becould to consider using this type of “identification system”, for lack of a better word..   

I keep reading about this announcement within various social networking venues.  As I wrote in my post of last week, describing the symptoms of a problem very specifically; defining the label will only help others to understand the condition and perhaps drop some prejudice towards these people. This is my opinion and one that I recall was actually discussed years ago during graduate school, as a part of a diagnostics class in which we were writing evaluations.  I learned to describe exactly what I saw instead of putting a label on it.  Interestingly, it seems that history is repeating itself.  Now it is coming out in public, outside of the classroom and into the “real world” where I think most of us learn how to do our jobs.  I wonder what parents  and caregivers think? If you are reading this i would be interested in hearing.  I think my colleagues too would be interested in hearing from you. Please reply.