Tag Archives: Individualized Education Program

Early Intervention Providers: Important Training to Develop Evaluation Skills

9 Oct

 
 
A colleague of mine provides this training and it has served as an invaluable resource  in completion of evaluations to increase likelihoood of children receiving our services.  In a highly difficult economic climate it is imperative for those of us who act as the voices for children who cannot speak to enroll in these highly helpful courses.   Rebecca Alva is on linkedin and you can connect with her there as well. 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Next EI Training Oct. 15th In NYC!

October 4th, 2011 | Author: Rebecca Alva
Performing Evaluations In Early Intervention is Coming Back to NYC!Location: Pearl Studios NYC, 519 Eighth Avenue (btw 35th & 36th), 12th Fl. (212) 904-1850

**********Early Bird Price of $227. applies for the September and October Dates!!**********

Look at The Trainings and Testimonial Tabs For Full Details

 

 
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EI Training In Commack, NY (LI) Held Today!

October 2nd, 2011 | Author: Rebecca Alva
Held my first EI Training in Commack, NY (LI) today. Here is what two attendees had to say:The course was very helpful in learning how to properly perform and write a complete Early Intervention Evaluation.
Erika Witt, Speech-Language Pathologist

Very informative, useful information.
Madelyn Ratkus, Speech-Language Pathologist

 

 
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“Thank You A Million Times Over”

September 30th, 2011 | Author: Rebecca Alva
An SLP Provider who has taken my trainings sent me the following e-mail with the subject line above, “I am writing up an eval on a bilingual baby that I saw with a translator….. I have your binder at my side…it is an invaluable resource right now.l’shanah tovah wherever you are today!

Robin Sue Kahn M.S., CCC/SLP
Speech-Language Pathologist

 

 
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October 1st EI Training Rescheduled!

September 30th, 2011 | Author: Rebecca Alva
The training has been rescheduled for Saturday – September 15th in NYC.Location: Pearl Studios NYC (212) 904.1850

519 Eighth Avenue, NY

Studio L

Thanks!

 

 
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Just finished giving a training yesterday on Performing Evaluations In Early Intervention!

September 25th, 2011 | Author: Rebecca Alva
Here is what two providers had to say about yesterday’s training:Rebecca Alva tailored this course to the immediate needs of Early Intervention Evaluators. This information is going to be so helpful when writing and performing evaluators. Many of the resources provided will help raise the quality of EI evaluations that are performed.
Karen M. Mackin, Speech-Language Pathologist

This course will really be helpful to me as I write my evals. Now I know exactly what the Evaluation Standards Unit wants as far as Informed Clinical Opinion…
Jennifer Sitler Redpath, Speech-Language Pathologist

 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Fall EI Trainings!

September 10th, 2011 | Author: Rebecca Alva
Performing Evaluations In Early InterventionCOURSE DESCRIPTION
Infants and toddlers from birth through age two, who live in New York City and who have a diagnosed physical or mental condition that has a high probability of resulting in a developmental delay, or who are suspected of having a developmental delay or disability are entitled to a developmental screening or a comprehensive evaluation to determine eligibility for additional early intervention services. Delays may be in one or more of the following areas of development: cognitive, physical, communication, social/emotional, and/or adaptive. Children at risk of a disability are eligible for initial screening, and will receive periodic screenings through the New York City Infant Child Health Assessment Program.

Providers are faced with increasing amounts of confusion and frustration in performing evaluations in the Early Intervention Program. EI providers will understand and learn how to properly incorporate several sources of information and improve the quality of their evaluations reports.

LEARNING OUTCOMES
• Discuss NYS DOH Public Health Law, codes, rules and regulations as it applies to Early Intervention.
• Discuss the Adopted Early Intervention Program Regulations 6/3/2010.
• Discuss NYS Memorandum 2005-02 Standards and Procedures for Evaluations, Reimbursement, Eligibility requirements and Determinations under the Early Intervention Program.
• Describe how no single procedure or instrument may be used as the sole indicator of eligibility in EI.
• Discuss how to appropriately interpret and use test scores in MDE (Multidisciplinary Evaluations).
• Describe how to incorporate information from a variety of appropriate sources into MDE’s.
• Describe how to appropriately use Clinical Clues and Predictors from the Clinical Practice Guideline: Communication Disorders, Autism/PDD, Hearing Impairments and Motor Disorders (Oral Motor Assessment for Feeding and Swallowing) in MDE’s.
• Formulate an Informed Clinical Opinion in MDE’s.

AGENDA
9:00 Registration & Refreshments
9:30 Introduction, Public Health Law & Adopted Early Intervention Program Regulations 6/3/2010
10:00 Regulations & Guidelines – Memo 2005-02
11:30 Break
11:45 Test Instruments, Use & Interpretation
1:00 Lunch on your own
2:00 Clinical Practice Guidelines, Clinical Clues/Predictors
3:30 Break
3:45 Integrating Several Sources of Information & Formulating your Informed Clinical Opinion
4:30 Group Discussion, Questions, Comment Form
5:00 Course Concludes

TARGET AUDIENCE
Speech-Language Pathologists*
Special Education Teachers
Physical Therapists
Occupational Therapists
Audiologist
Licensed Psychologists
Licensed Social Workers
Agency Directors & Personnel

CONTINUING EDUCATION CREDITS
*Participants must have paid registration fee, signed-in, miss no more than 1 hr., participate in a written self examination and signed out in order to receive a Certificate of Completion.

Failure to sign-in or out will result in forfeiture of credit for the entire course. No exceptions will be made. Partial credit is not available.

DATES & LOCATIONS
Sept 24th (Sat-Queens), Oct 1st (Sat-NYC), Oct 2nd (Sun-LI), Nov 5th (Sat-NYC) and Dec 17th (Sat-NYC)

Course Locations:
Queens
92-30 56th Avenue, Rego Park, NY 11373 (Toledo Court Community Room)
(Behind Queens Center Shopping Mall & Next to Newtown Preschool/Playground).

New York City
Pearl Studios NYC, 519 Eighth Avenue (btw 35th & 36th), 12th Fl. (212) 904-1850

Long Island
Wingate by Wyndham Commack, Long Island NY – 801 Crooked Hill Road Brentwood, NY 11717

REGISTRATION & FEES
Improve the quality of your evaluations by registering for this training!
Register by phone: 917.885.3146 or by e-mail: ralva@bigplanet.com

*****Early Bird Price of $227 applies for the September and October Dates!!!*****

Registration Fee: $257
Early Bird: $227 (Must Be Received/Paid for 25 days prior to the training dates for Nov & Dec)
Group Rates: $217 each (2+), $207 each (4+), $197 each (6+) and $187 each (8+)

ALL PAYMENTS MUST BE PAID IN FULL PRIOR TO ATTENDANCE
Mail Check Payments to: Rebecca Alva, 92-30 56th Ave, Apt. 4N, Rego Park, NY 11373 or
by Credit Card (VISA, MasterCard, Amex) via Paypal – http://www.paypal.com

Note: The fee includes materials/handouts and light refreshments.
Please submit your accommodation requests for special needs in writing via e-mail at lease two weeks prior to the course.

CONFIRMATIONS & CANCELLATIONS
Confirmation: is available upon receipt of payment and sent via e-mail in an effort to be “green”.

Cancellation Policy (Organization): Evaluations Standards Training, LLC reserves the right to cancel or reschedule any course/workshop/training due to insufficient registration or extenuating circumstances. A full refund will be provided to the participants unless they choose a credit towards a future training. If the refund is requested, it will be in the same format of payment either by check or credit card.

Cancellation Policy (Participant): A refund less a $50.00 administration fee will be provided upon receipt of written request. Refund requests must be received by mail (postmarked) or e-mail 8 days or more prior to the date of the training. There is no refund for cancellations received 7 days or less prior to the date of training; however, a credit will be issued toward a future training.

 

 
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Back From Hiatus!

September 9th, 2011 | Author: Rebecca Alva
EI Trainings To Continue This Fall!Performing Evaluations will be offered in October, November and December.

Dates and Locations (NYC/LI) to follow!

 

 
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Performing Evaluations In Early Intervention – February 13, 2011

February 25th, 2011 | Author: Rebecca Alva
On February 13, 2011 Providers attended the 2nd EI Training on Performing Evaluations In Early Intervention. Here is what one Provider had to say: This training truly was a training like no other. We were provided with tons of functional information that I intend to use ASAP! I now am more clear on the regulations put forth by Early Intervention Department of Health.
Alisha Price, SLP 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Teaching Students at Teachers College, Columbia University

February 25th, 2011 | Author: Rebecca Alva
I was asked by Catherine J. Crowley, CCC-SLP, J.D., Ph.D., ASHA Fellow and Board Recognized Specialist in Child Language, to teach her Assessment and Evaluation class on Thursday, February 24th at Teachers College, Columbia University. My lecture for the students was on the Standards and Procedures for Evaluations & Eligibility Requirements Under the Early Intervention Program. It was great sharing my knowledge with the students! 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Performing Evaluations In Early Intervention – January 23, 2011

February 25th, 2011 | Author: Rebecca Alva
Here is what two Providers had to say about the EI Training:Amazing! This workshop was very helpful & informative. I received a lot of documents that will help me when writing evaluations. The information received will also help me to evaluate myself in how I approach evaluations. I learned a lot regarding the laws and regulations that determine eligibility for Early Intervention. I am now able to provide support for any recommendations I make in future evaluations. Jeanel Burgess-Belfon, Speech-Language Pathologist

It was very informative and it was nice to get paper copies of all the materials. Rebecca was very knowledgeable and an engaging speaker. I loved learning about the laws that are in place and I think that this will help me to be a better report/eval writer in general. Maria Niemiec, Special Educator

 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
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Copyright © 2011 Rebecca Alva, M.A. CCC-SLP. All Rights Reserved.

 
 
 
 

Communicating About Disabilities With Your Child

24 Sep

The attraction to disability may be nothing mo...

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So – your child has received an IFSP (individualized family service plan) or the IEP (individualized education plan).  They are now going to start receiving services.  You receive copies of reports and now have to absorb in black and white what your child’s difficulties entail.  These are very hard for a parent to read.  Maybe you need some support in understanding the disability, learning how to help your child.  Does this sound familiar?  This is now your life and your child’s life. You have to look the problem right in the face, just as the people in the picture above are doing to something that is unknown to us, but in the distance. You are not sure really what it is but as the figure moves closer,  a new reality takes place for you and your child. 

Good news is that those who work with infants, toddlers, older children and adults with disabilities or learning differences can act as invaluable supports.  They can help advocate for your child and aid you as a parent in understanding the nature of the problems with which he or she lives.  Professionals can help you learn how to teach your child about compensating for the difficulty that they have so that they develop into functional and safe adults. 

There  is an important key here – we are talking about your CHILD.  Parents do a disservice to your child if this is not something that is not openly discuss at home,  from the time that your child is young.  You may readthis and wonder how in the world do you talk to a child about the problem that they have and at what age?. 

Preschool aged children with disabilities are in classrooms with typically developing classmates, depending on the severity of the problem.  At younger and younger ages children are consequently becoming aware of differences in others.  This concept mayy already be discussed at school before you have gotten around to it.  Your child deserves to hear about their personal situation from their parent or other primary caregiver first.  So – here are a few jumping off  points for you.

With a child as young as preschool age, you might start very simply at pointing out things that a child may see around him or her.  Perhaps you pass by a person who is blind and walks with a seeing eye dog.  Talk about what the dog does.  A family member wears glasses, a person is in a wheelchair, the universal symbol for handicap accessibility.  Discuss theese situations.  

Your child’s teacher, school director, religious leader and/or the pediatrician might able to guide you in recommending books that describe the disability specific to your child.  They may also know about books that describe children in general, who may have disabilities or difficulties in learning.

Television shows such as “Dora the Explorer“, “SpongeBob Square Pants“, “Little Bear” and “Sesame Street” have episodes  in which the children have disabilities.  You may choose to watch these shows with your child and discuss this if the situation presents itself. 

Talking to your child, especially as they are young adults of what they have to do to keep themselves safe. For example, if they take medication then perhaps they should not be drinking alcohol. If they have a physical disability and want to drive a car, they may need to be guided in terms of adapting the vehicle.  Again – be guided by professionals treating your child for especial significant points to discuss with them. 

 Part of maturing as a person is understanding who we are.   If we do not truly do so, then how can we take care of ourselves as we grow.  Consider this true story.  A young man who lives with ADHD at his Bar Mitzvah (a right  of passage into adulthood; typically at the age of thirteen, within the Jewish religion) prepared a discussion about the Torah portion for that week.  He presented it to his family and friends.  The discussion was striking.  The young man said that he thought that the Biblical character, Moses, had difficulty controlling his anger and had an impulsive side to him.   He illustrated that within the Torah reading for that week.  Further, he related this to himself.  He was able to openly discuss his own disability, having recognized it in someone else. 

The next day, the same teen-ager left for school and by the end of a year demonstrated some ability to calm himself down in moments of anger more efficiently so that he was not physically hurting  other people. In this particular case, it is an ongoing process – but his awareness of the problem is ultimately what is enabling him to compensate for it.  He has taken ownership for this particular aspect  of his personality. 

Resources  are out there to help parents as well as adults.   Here is a sample of a few that might be meaningful for others reading this post but you can generally find this information by just typing into a search bar the name of the disability, illness, problem and information for parents, children and adults generally are found. 

CHADD (children and adults with ADHD) www.chadd.org has a link that is designed to give parents information

Sensory Processing Disorder Foundation www.sinetwork.org

Autism Society of America www.autim-society.org

Stuttering Foundation: tips for parents www.stutteringhelp.org

American Speech-Language Hearing Association: www.asha.org has a link for “self-help groups for speech-language and swallowing disorders” and “resources” which links you to ways to help a child  or adult understand a hearing disorder

American Psychiatric Association www.ParentsMed.Org provides resources about medication for children as well as adults

Epilepsy Foundation www.epilepsyfoundation.org

If you go into either www.pbsparents.org or www.nick.com and type in a search for information, programming related to children with disabilities a number of resources are loaded and provide assistance for both parents and caregivers.

If anyone reading this has more information that they think would be useful for others, please comment so that others can benefit.  Thanks.

Getting Started in the New School Year: Checklist for you…

16 Sep

An orange check mark.

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Ok…now it is week two. 

BE AN ADVOCATE.. and keep going…..

Your child in the new school has a counselor. Call that person who you got the name of during week one.

Follow up.  Check if they have that IEP. If they do not have the IEP with their school name on it then you will need to call your local school district and have them send it on.  Request a copy for yourself too. 

Ask to double check your child’s daily schedule – regardless of their age.  Are they getting the classes that they are supposed to be.  Are the preschool programs in sync with what you were told that they would be.  Just check.  If you are confused then ask now.

Try to get the name of the therapist who is going to work with your child.  Just work on getting a name at this point of the year.    

Get a composition book and proactively write “communication book” on the front of it.  This book should be given to your child’s teacher  or counselor with a request that it be given to the new therapist.

Write a note introducing yourself in the communication book and  ask for the new therapist’s name and phone number.  If the therapist has an email ask for that too.

Ask the therapist -in your introductory note, to connect with you when your child begins session and to give you their name.  Offer your contact information and keep a line of communication open.

Give the therapist a couple of weeks to respond to you.  It sometimes takes a little bit of time to get schedules together.  In the meantime – YOUR homework is to lay the groundwork for organizing communication between you and the school.  You should have the IEP at the school by the end of this coming week, if not earlier. 

BE PERSISTENT…. and KEEP GOING….

My child just got an IEP (individualized education plan) and is in a new school this year. What do i do???

4 Sep

"Teacher Appreciation" featured phot...

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Is your child starting a new school?  If so, you most likely are feeling a certain amount of anxiety, as is your child if he or she is old enough to understand what this means for them.

BE AN ADVOCATE

Ensure that your child does not fall through the cracks….

You might think something like …what are the teachers going to be like?  will my child like his or her teacher and will they make friends at the school?  You are probably wondering when the services that are authorized will start.  Well – here is news for you they may not start on time unless you stay involved.  This is not to put down anyone who might an administrator or teacher in any one school – but things sometimes happen, especially in a large educational system – like the public school system.  You  a tremendous help and partner in making sure that your child gets help.  Here are some quick suggestions for you to keep in mind.

Having worked in schools; with the professional hat on (so to speak), i can give you some advice. Some schools do not see the paperwork for students who have an IEP (if it is a public school program, especially) until the school district sends them over.

It will be helpful if when you go to school – during the first week, stop by the main office and give the principal a copy personally.

Get the name of the director of special education services at the school. If that is not the exact title – just explain to the staff that your child receives services – he is mandated for — therapy (fill in the blank) and you would like to introduce yourself.  I believe that they will really appreciate this initiative on your part.  It also sends a very positive message to the school about YOU as a parent. 

Now that the school is aware of the fact that your child is to be receiving services….Make sure that your child is on the list of students who should be receiving services in the school. This is extremely important because sometimes not all the names have been sent over from the district office.

Inform your child’s classroom teacher and ask for the name of the person who will be providing services.  Get a phone number/extension for that person and an idea of when they will be in school. Be aware that sometimes related service providers/therapists might travel between different schools during any particular work week.

Ask the school in a few weeks to tell you of the schedule for therapy for your child.

Ask the therapist for a weekly report – bring in a composition book…put in your name and phone number and ask for theirs. 

Double check the number of sessions that your child can receive during the year.  With budget cuts impacting on services across the country and possibly, a limit on this should not be overlooked!

In October – we will revisit this topic for next steps.  Schedules may not necessarily be finalized until the first few weeks  into that month – but make a start to get involved in the process.  It will be appreciated and most important – will benefit both you and your child.